Voss Literary Prize

Long list for the 2020 Voss Literary Prize

Steven Carroll, The Year of the Beast (HarperCollinsPublishers)

Alex Landragin, Crossings (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Wayne Macauley, Simpson Returns (Text Publishing)

Andrew McGahan, The Rich Man’s House (Allen & Unwin)

Mohammed Massoud Morsi, The Palace of Angels (Wild Dingo Press)

Meg Mundell, The Trespassers (University of Queensland Press)

Kate Richards, Fusion (Penguin Random House Australia)

Carrie Tiffany, Exploded View (Text Publishing Company)

Lucy Treloar, Wolfe Island (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Tara June Winch, The Yield (Penguin Random House Australia)

 

 

Winner of the 2019 Voss Literary Prize Announced

The winner of the 2019 Voss Literary Prize ($5,000) for the best Australian novel published in 2018 is Tim Winton, for The Shepherd’s Hut, published by Penguin Random House Australia.

Tim Winton is one of Australia’s most recognised authors and this book has garnered rapturous reviews in Australia and internationally.

The Shepherd’s Hut is narrated by an anger-fuelled 15-year-old boy, Jaxie Clackton, living in a depressed rural town outside of Perth. Believing he will be blamed for the death of his brutal father, Jaxie flees, on foot, into the gold country. He stumbles across an aged Irish priest, Fintan MacGillis, living alone in the wilderness, exiled by his order for misdeeds unspecified. Fintan feeds the boy, tends his injuries, and treats him with respect. Jaxie starts to see the world – and himself – differently.

MacGillis is murdered most savagely and Jaxie is alone again, but there is a hint of redemption – he’s back on the road, drawn north to his girl-cousin Lee, the only other person he knows who accepts him as he is. Self-hatred is replaced by self-knowledge. Fear is replaced by hope.

This is a gut-wrenching novel that is full of ambiguities – it doesn’t make an argument or solve a problem, but instead follows its characters as they interact with each other and the landscape. There’s violence aplenty, born of poverty, isolation, lack of education and absence of compassion. The horror is leavened by humour, by language (the rich poetry of Jaxie’s profanities and Fintan’s brogue, rolling with classical and biblical allusions), and the consolations of the natural world.

Winton challenges the inevitability of violence passing from father to son and asks if it can be short-circuited by an intervention of kindness, mercy and love. Michael McGirr captured the essence of the book perfectly when he wrote in the Sydney Morning Herald:

‘There is music in this brilliant and uncomfortable book … a landmark book in Winton’s career: austere, beautiful and compelling. It has a subtle moral clarity that stands out even in a career that has relentlessly searched for the gold hidden in human rubble … After three readings, The Shepherd’s Hut was still yielding the riches of its unblinking vision of hope, a vision that will renew readers for generations to come.’

To say more than that is redundant.

Winner of the 2017 Voss Literary Prize Announced

Congratulations to the winner of 2017 Voss Prize Mark O’Flynn for his novel The Last Days of Ava Langdon.  The prize was announced at the annual meeting of the AUHE on 1 December.

Congratulations to Mark and to his publisher the University of Queensland Press for a wonderful book about the extraordinary Ava Langdon. Inspired by the story of that singular Australian writer Eve Langley, Flynn’s central character is “so wonderfully drawn”, according to the judges “that we experience vicariously her emotional chaos as she bounces from optimism to anguish to creative fervour”. As with the characters of Kate Grenville and Elizabeth Jolley, “We laugh along with them, but we also feel their pain, recognising in it the loneliness of being human.”

O’Flynn is also a poet and, for the judges, “this shows in his vivid descriptions of the bush surrounding Ava’s shack, her perambulations around the streets of Katoomba, the startling images he and Ava employ, and their love of obscure and original words, verbal jokes and allusions.” The prize was a special thrill for AUHE’s many fans of Langley.

And in an exception for the Voss award, this year the judges felt that a second title was worth special recognition and highly commended Jessica Rowe’s A Loving, Faithful Animal (also from University of Queensland Press). The judges described it: “Set in the post-Vietnam war period, it explores the psychic wounds inflicted on those who were sent to fight, and the wounds they, on return, inflicted on their families.  It is an intricate novel, told in five voices, precise in language and devoid of sentimentality.  It asks, in the words of the New York Times reviewer, ‘whether we ever move fast enough to escape this deep damage’.” Congratulations to Jennifer too.

 

Judges’ Report: 2017 Voss Literary Prize

The winner of the 2017 Voss Literary Prize ($5,000) for the best Australian novel published in 2016 is

Mark O’Flynn, for The Last Days of Ava Langdon, published by University of Queensland Press.

It’s no secret that Mark O’Flynn references that singular Australian novelist Eve Langley as he embeds himself, and us, in the consciousness of his fictional fabulist, Ava Langdon, on the last day of her life, 1 June 1974. His intent is signalled by Ava, enjoying her bottle of sherry in Hinkler Park on a cloudy Katoomba day: ‘I will not be a captive to biography’, she cries, swishing her machete at a laurel hedge and startling a nearby mother and child.

The character of Ava is so wonderfully drawn that we experience vicariously her emotional chaos as she bounces from optimism to anguish to creative fervour, refracting the everyday world through her imagination, in turn philosophical and febrile.  Ava, with her alter ego, Oscar Wilde, is more ‘real’ to us than the biographical Eve, who spent her final years as a recluse in a shack outside Katoomba, scribbling never-to-be-published novels (the final one the uncompleted The Saunterer), dying alone and lying undiscovered for several weeks.

Ava’s eccentric exuberance, undercut by a darker strain of mental instability, resonates with Kate Grenville’s Lilian Singer (drawn from Bea Miles) and so many of Elizabeth Jolley’s characters. Common to them all is the love the authors have for their characters and the tenderness with which they are portrayed.  We laugh out loud with them, but we also feel their pain, recognising in it the loneliness of being human.

O’Flynn has written previously of Eve Langley, and perhaps the challenge of finding her ‘voice’ for his 2002 play, Eleanor and Eve (which portrayed a fictional meeting between Eve Langley and Eleanor Dark), along with his study of Langley’s writings, accounts for Ava’s pitch-perfect voice as she constructs narratives of her own life and narratives for each of the townspeople – cruel and compassionate – who cross her path that day when she sets off to post her final manuscript, The Saunteress, to Douglas Stewart at Angus & Robertson.

O’Flynn is a poet and this shows in his vivid descriptions of the bush surrounding Ava’s shack, her perambulations around the streets of Katoomba, the startling images he and Ava employ, and their love of obscure and original words, verbal jokes and allusions.  But whereas Ava’s novels sprawl over hundreds of single-spaced pink pages, O’Flynn’s Last Days of Ava Langdon is a model of compression, a joy to read, and a spur to reacquainting ourselves with the historical and authorial Eve Langley, the Eve Langley of literary scholars, the ever shape-changing Eve Langley.

The judges also commended Josephine Rowe for A Loving, Faithful Animal (University of Queensland Press). Rowe’s book is a compassionate portrayal of intergenerational trauma – the way trauma undergone by one generation can be passed on to succeeding generations.  Set in the post-Vietnam war period, it explores the psychic wounds inflicted on those who were sent to fight, and the wounds they, on return, inflicted on their families.  It is an intricate novel, told in five voices, precise in language and devoid of sentimentality.  It asks, in the words of the New York Times reviewer, ‘whether we ever move fast enough to escape this deep damage’.

Judges: Elaine Lindsay, Margaret Henderson, Matt McGuire, Ann Vickery and Joy Wallace.

 

2017 Shortlist for the Voss Literary Prize

Congratulations to these six Australian writers, short-listed for the annual Voss literary prize in 2017, awarded to the best novel published in the previous year.

The shortlisted titles are:

Jack Cox, Dodge Rose

Jennifer Down, Our Magic Hour

Toni Jordan, Our Tiny, Useless Hearts

Zoe Morrison, Music and Freedom

Mark O’Flynn, The Last Days of Ava Langdon  

Josephine Rowe, A Loving, Faithful Animal   

Four of these six titles are debut novels and the other two come from established authors whose writing breaks new ground in different ways. A very lively contemporary Australian literary scene is opening new windows onto our shared lives in truly innovative ways – AUHE commends these novels to their readers.

The Voss award for the best novel published in Australia in 2016-2017 will be announced on 1 December at the annual meeting of the AUHE in Adelaide.

 

About the Prize

The Voss Literary Prize is an award dedicated to the memory of Robert de Vaux Voss (1930-1963), an historian and lover of literature from Emu Park in Central Queensland, who studied History and Latin at the University of Sydney and Modern Languages at the University of Rome. His will stipulated that a literary award be established to reward the best novel from the previous year. The executors of the estate have appointed the Australian University Heads of English (AUHE), the peak body for the study of English at Australian universities, to oversee and judge the award.

For more information, please visit:

vossliteraryprize.com

 

Links

Voss Prize 2017

Voss Prize 2016

Voss Prize 2015

Voss Prize 2014